Against the Grain: Soil Constraints Holding Back Australian Wheat
Grain Central – 11/1/2018
A model developed by researchers at The University of Queensland could address soil problems that cost Australia’s wheat producers almost $2 billion a year. “Soil sodicity (too much sodium in the soil) salinity, acidity and alkalinity and compaction significantly affect grain production in Australia.”

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Analysis: Wheat Markets Continue to Fight for Higher Prices
Ag Professional 
– 10/30/2018 (video story)
Jared Creed of JJC Marketing Services talks with U.S. Farm Report’s Tyne Morgan about wheat exports and the winter wheat crop.

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Wheat Export Report: ‘Farmers Will Continue to Feel the Pain’ From Trade War
The Farmer 
– 10/31/2018
A former chairman of the International Trade Commission told an international group of grain buyers and sellers attending an export conference in Minneapolis last week that President Donald Trump’s tariffs are “the most antifarmer trade policy since the Carter embargo.” “Farmers will continue to feel the pain,” said Dan Pearson, the former ITC chairman. “Tariffs on steel, aluminum, and China [produced goods] seem likely to stay in place for many months — perhaps through the end of the presidential term in 2020 … [There is] no obvious off-ramp that allows the administration to shift gracefully to a different path.”

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Kansas Farmers May Plant Less Wheat Than Estimated Due to Heavy Rains
Bloomberg – 10/31/2018
One of the wettest Octobers on record in Kansas, the largest U.S. wheat producer, may lead farmers to plant fewer acres with the grain than expected. Parts of eastern and central Kansas have gotten double or triple the amount of normal rainfall in October, with one station in Emporia recording 9 inches, according to Paul Markert, a senior meteorologist for Radiant Solutions in Gaithersburg, Maryland. All this rain has slowed down the harvest of soybeans and delayed seeding of winter wheat on that same ground.

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Winter Wheat Crop Rating Below Expectations
DTN The Progressive Farmer 
– 10/31/2018
Plantings of the 2019 U.S. winter wheat crop have been lagging based on wet weather in the Plains that has delayed seedings for the hard red winter crop, but also in the southern Midwest where October rains have corn and soybean harvesting rather slowly. In turn, this has limited plantings of the soft red winter wheat crop in that region of the country. With this precipitation it had been expected that the first winter wheat condition report of the fall would show this year’s initial crop condition above average but that was not the case.

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Source: U.S. Wheat Associates