Greetings!

We hope you enjoy this week’s edition of KAWG E-News.

 

Political leaders peer into crystal ball of Kansas agriculture’s future

Via Topeka Capital-Journal

Outgoing Gov. Sam Brownback wistfully reflected on the administration’s work on agriculture policy Thursday before plugging a strategy for building an empire through relocation of the American Royal across the state line into Kansas.

 

He spoke with pride about inspiring a collaborative effort among farmers who rely on irrigation to slow depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer, expressed gratitude for emergence of ethanol production to expand the market for bumper corn harvests and looked forward to completion of the $1.2 billion National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility in Manhattan.

But, Brownback said, the nucleus of an economic marvel can be found in construction of the $160 million American Royal complex in Kansas City, Kan.

“It’s going to be more than a stock show,” Brownback said. “We want to be the center of agriculture technology for the world. We want to be the center of genetic marketing for the world. In Kansas. Here. Us. That’s a vision we have.” [Read more]

 

NAFTA talks: Round 1 is over. Here’s what’s next

Via CNN Money

Experts say the issues are complex. And President Trump insists he wants major changes to a trade pact he considers a raw deal for American workers — he made reworking it a central promise of his campaign.

 

The first round of talks to redo the three-nation trade pact concluded in Washington on Sunday.

 

Representatives from the three countries said Sunday that negotiations will continue at a “rapid pace,” adding that “a great deal of effort and negotiation will be required in the coming months.”

 

The countries “are committed to an accelerated and comprehensive negotiation process” that will establish “21st century standards” that benefit citizens, they said in a statement.

 

Round 2 of the NAFTA talks are set to be held for September 1-5 in Mexico City. The third: late September in Ottawa.

 

Round 4 will be held in Washington, D.C. in October. In total, seven rounds are expected through December. A U.S. official cautioned that December isn’t a firm deadline and that talks could stretch into early 2018. [Read more]

 

 

The documentary ‘Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman’ takes you to some unexpected places

Via Los Angeles Times

The cowboy on horseback. The farmer amid endless fields of grain. The fisherman standing on the prow of his boat. Could there be more classic American images than these?

 

But what about the people behind these images? Are they as stereotypical as people imagine, especially where conservation is concerned? The documentary “Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman” examines that question and comes to some unexpected conclusions.

 

Co-directed by doc veterans Susan Froemke (who for many years worked for Maysles Films) and John Hoffman and playing for an Oscar-qualifying week before running on Discovery, “Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman” is an involving film that tells a more complicated story than its unexciting title would indicate.

 

Two centuries ago, we’re informed, 80% of Americans worked in these kinds of jobs. Now it is 1% of the population that manages two-thirds of our land.

 

Half a continent away, the filmmakers pick up the story of Justin Knopf, the fifth generation of a family to grow wheat on a 4,000-acre farm in Salina, Kan.

 

But just because, as he says, “we’re not a small organic farm” does not mean Knopf is unconcerned about conservation. “We don’t have the luxury to forsake the environment,” he says, though what that means specifically is inevitably different than what it means in Montana.

 

In an area where residents remember stories of how topsoil erosion led to the Dust Bowl, being proactive in preventing a repetition is a top priority.

Which is how Knopf became a believer in no-till farming, a system of working with nature and not against it by using crop rotation and regenerative planting instead of a plow.

 

Looking at one of the last native prairies, one farmer comments, “it’s been undisturbed since Jesus walked the Earth. Once you kill it, it’s gone forever.”

[Read more]

 

News from National Association of Wheat Growers

Next NAFTA Rounds Begin in Early September
Negotiators from Canada, Mexico and the United States will sit down in Mexico City over Labor Day weekend for round 2 of the NAFTA negotiations. According to Politico Pro, they’ll then head to Canada two and a half weeks later for round 3. The Mexico City round, slated for Sept. 1-5, will come less than two weeks after the opening round wraped up in Washington this past Sunday. The Canadian round is anticipated to take place Sept. 23-27, although the city has not yet been set.

WOTUS Deadline for Comments Extended
The federal government has extended the public comment period on a waters of the United States, or WOTUS, rule that would revert the definition of navigable waters to the pre-2015 regulation. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will be providing an additional 30 days to receive comments. The deadline has been extended from Aug. 28 to Sept. 27. The Progressive Farmer covered the story.

Call for 2017 Pollinator Advocate and Agricultural Pollinator Conservation Awards
NAPPC, through its recognition and appreciation of Pollinator Advocates, encourages their activities and hopes to catalyze future actions on behalf of pollinators. Each year the awards are given in Canada, the United States, and Mexico supporting all of the work that goes into protecting North American pollinator populations. Winners of the Pollinator Advocate Awards will be recognized at a VIP reception opening the 17th Annual North American Pollinator Protection Campaign Conference hosted at US Botanic Garden, Washington, DC, or in their hometown if they are unable to attend. Nominations are due – FRIDAY, AUGUST 31st, 2017. Link to the nomination forms and for more information can be found here.

WILOT Leadership Program Has Few Remaining Openings
The Wheat Industry Leaders of Tomorrow (WILOT) program of the National Wheat Foundation (NWF) is a five-day program providing in-depth leadership training for current and potential state and national wheat grower leaders. This year’s program be taking place from November 13-17th, 2017 in St. Louis, MO. With two spots remaining, this program is quickly filling up. Pease email NAWG’s Federal Government Relations’ Coordinator Craig Berning with any questions about the program or for application information.

 

August Farmer Spotlight Series Honoree Announced
Field to Market has announced its August Farmer Spotlight series honoree. Justin Knopf of Gypsum, Kansas is a 5th generation farmer growing alfalfa, corn, grain sorghum, soybeans, and wheat. You can read how Justin is “Fostering a Long-term Connection with the Land” by clicking here.

 

LARRY GLENN COMMENTARY: POSSIBLY START OF A RECOVERY IN THE WHEAT PRICE

Cautiously optimistic is my opinion for an advance in the wheat price.  This week’s price action finally registered a positive trading session on Thursday.  This is the best sign of a rebound in the wheat price seen in the last eight weeks.  During these eight weeks, the December Kansas City wheat price had a range of $1.78 from the July 5th high.  A sharp break in such a short time should lend to a recovery in the wheat price.

 

With the price trend in the wheat pointing down, bullish fundamental news are hard to find.  This is an example of the news following the market.  This week, weekly export sales amounted to 386,000 metric tons.  This was a decent number but not a high number.  The only surprise was a wheat purchase of 54,000 metric tons by China.  China buys our wheat to fill the milling needs at their ports.

 

There was talk of hard red winter wheat being sold to North African countries.  Those needing high quality, milling wheat view our price as a value.  The drop in our U. S. Dollar adds value to our wheat export business.   On Friday, the U. S. Dollar reversed a short-term up trend and managed to close 10 points above contract low.

 

Trading at the end of the week gives hope for a rebound in the wheat price.  Look most moves in commodity prices, the wheat price feels like it traveled too far to the down side.  Wheat producers holding wheat should consider selling and re-own those bushels.  Stop the storage cost.  Re-ownership can be achieved by buying futures and/or buying call options.  Numerous strategies present themselves. To review a strategy that fits your program, please give me a call.

 

LARRY GLENN

800-270-7694

 

PLEASE NOTE THAT THERE IS AN INHERENT RISK OF LOSS ASSOCIATED WITH TRADING FUTURES AND OPTION CONTRATCS EVEN, WHEN USED FOR HEDGING PURPOSES.  PLEASE CAREFULLY CONSIDER YOUR FINANCIAL CONDITION BEFORE INVESTING IN FUTURES AND OPTION CONTRACTS.  FUTURE’S TRADING IS NOT SUITABLE FOR ALL INVESTORS.  OPTIONS CAN AND DO EXPIRE WORTHLESS.  IF YOU PURCHASE A COMMODITY OPTION, YOU MAY SUSTAIN A TOTAL LOSS OF THE PREMIUM AND OF ALL TRANSACTION COSTS.

 

PAST PERFORMANCE IS NOT INDICATIVE OF FUTURE RESULTS.

 

SEASONAL TENDENCIES ARE A COMPOSITE OF SOME OF THE MOST CONSISTENT COMMODITY FUTURES SEASONALS THAT HAVE OCCURRED IN THE PAST SEVERAL YEARS.  EVEN IF A SEASONAL TENDENCY OCCURS IN THE FUTURE, IT MAY NOT RESULT IN A PROFITABLE TRANSACTION AS FEES AND THE TIMING OF THE ENTRY AND LIQUIDATION MAY AFFECT THE RESULTS.

Best Regards,

Kansas Wheat Staff

 

 

Source: Kansas Association of Wheat Growers

 

 

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